Office of Research & Development

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VA RESEARCH QUARTERLY UPDATE
 

New Initiatives

Relationship between diabetes and vascular inflammation in older Veterans to be studied


   One in five VA patients has diabetes, and a new study will examine the role that vascular inflammation plays in the disease. Here, Veterans Glenn Williams
    (left) and Ronald Ross (right), both participants in a diabetes study at the Philadelphia VA, meet with study coordinator Kirsten Rogers. <em>(Photo by Tommy
    Leonardi)</em>
One in five VA patients has diabetes, and a new study will examine the role that vascular inflammation plays in the disease. Here, Veterans Glenn Williams (left) and Ronald Ross (right), both participants in a diabetes study at the Philadelphia VA, meet with study coordinator Kirsten Rogers. (Photo by Tommy Leonardi)

One in five VA patients has diabetes, and a new study will examine the role that vascular inflammation plays in the disease. Here, Veterans Glenn Williams (left) and Ronald Ross (right), both participants in a diabetes study at the Philadelphia VA, meet with study coordinator Kirsten Rogers. (Photo by Tommy Leonardi)

Diabetes affects about 1 million Veterans within the VA health care system, nearly 20 percent of VA's patient population.

Type 2 diabetes usually occurs in adults. In this type of diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin to keep blood glucose normal. The condition is associated with resistance to insulin and higher concentrations of sugar and insulin in the blood. More than 90 percent of adults with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

Among the more common effects of high blood sugar and insulin is the occurrence of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the constriction and eventual closure of blood vessels that lead to and from the heart and brain, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes. A condition called vascular inflammation makes atherosclerosis worse.

An ongoing study at the Eastern Colorado VA Medical Center led by Dr. Marc L. Goalstone is exploring some of the causes of vascular inflammation and hopes to determine the role that high concentrations of insulin play in atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation. Dr. Goalstone is also a lecturer in the University of Colorado Denver's department of integrative biology.


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Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.