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Research links multiple forms of trauma with eating disorders in female Vets

VA research has identified clear ties between trauma and eating disorders in women Veterans. One recent study found that women who reported military sexual trauma were twice as likely to develop an eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating.... (07/20/2017)

Researchers pinpoint reductions in brain volume of ill Gulf War Vets

A study at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System has shown a "systematic and significant" reduction in brain volumes of about 10 percent in Vets with Gulf War illness, compared with non-affected Veterans.... (07/20/2017)

Prostate Cancer: Study Finds No Statistical Difference Between Surgery, Observation in Reducing Deaths

A VA-led clinical trial that spanned nearly 20 years has concluded that surgery does not significantly reduce all-cause or prostate cancer deaths for men who are diagnosed in the early stages of the disease. The findings should help inform the debate over how best to treat the common cancer.... (07/13/2017)

Don't snore through this: Study aims to highlight risks of sleep apnea in African-Americans—and potential benefits of treatment

A VA study in Chicago is compiling evidence on how CPAP therapy for sleep apnea can benefit a demographic group that has traditionally underused the treatment—African-Americans.... (06/28/2017)

Study explores ways in which melamine, found in household items, can cause kidney damage

A new study from the Calcium Signaling Laboratory at the Washington DC VA Medical Center sheds new light on how melamine, found in tableware and many other plastic products, can contribute toward kidney cell damage and kidney stone formation.... (06/28/2017)

Pain in the neck? Caregiver-assisted massage might pose solution

A new VA study is teaching Veterans’ informal caregivers how to give massages to ease neck pain. A four-hour training is reinforced with a workbook and DVD. ... (06/22/2017)

Study suggests possible ties between low cholesterol levels and suicide risk in Vets

Past research suggests a possible link between abnormally low cholesterol and suicide risk. A small study based on data from one VA site indicates the theory may warrant further investigation.... (06/22/2017)

Researcher: U.N. suicide prevention program should be studied among U.S. Veterans

VA researchers assessed suicide prevention methods used around the world by reviewing published trials. They found promising evidence for the World Health Organization's "brief intervention and contact program."... (06/14/2017)

Reckless behavior fuels ongoing stress for some with PTSD

VA researchers found that for those with PTSD, risky and harmful behaviors could lead to more trauma and, in turn, worse PTSD symptoms over time.... (06/14/2017)

Study yields insight on sexual disorder and its effects on Vets

VA researchers have conducted the most thorough study to date on compulsive sexual behavior among Veterans. In the study of 820 recent combat Veterans, almost 14 percent of men and more than 4 percent of women acknowle... (06/07/2017)

Large study assessing needs, experiences of pregnant and postpartum Veterans

Little is known about how women Veterans access and use maternity care during pregnancy and following childbirth. Researchers are thus undertaking one of the most comprehensive VA studies yet on women's maternal health care issues.... (06/07/2017)

Early-life pain may contribute to obesity risk, finds rat study

Researchers found in a study with rats that inflammatory pain at birth changes how the hippocampus works later in life. The change leads to eating more frequently, and in larger amounts.... (06/07/2017)

Addressing the crisis in drug treatment of PTSD

A group of VA researchers has forged a set of recommendations to address what they say is a "crisis" in the area of drug treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder.... (05/30/2017)

On the Hill: VA researchers visit D.C. to show latest rehab technology

VA ingenuity was on display on Capitol Hill on May 16, as researchers showed off new technologies that can potentially improve the lives of Veterans and others with limb loss or neurological disorders such as paralysis.... (05/30/2017)

Treating liver cancer: Access to 'best care' critical to survival

Liver cancer is a complex disease that must be treated by multiple specialists working in concert. A VA study looked at challenges in expanding optimal care for Veterans with the disease, and at some promising solutions.... (05/24/2017)

Lithium, long used for other brain conditions, may hold promise for TBI

A VA lab group in Pittsburgh is studying how the drug lithium affects the release of neurotransmitters after traumatic brain injury. They hope to generate evidence to support a future clinical trial. ... (05/18/2017)

New app will target Veterans in cardiac rehab

A new app aims to help Veterans with a recent heart attack or other heart problem who are in a medically supervised exercise and lifestyle program... (05/11/2017)

Knee popping? You may be at risk for arthritis

Noisy knees—or crepitus, in medical jargon—may be a warning sign of worsening osteoarthritis for some people, suggests a new VA study.... (05/11/2017)

Standing tall

VA researchers are studying the ReWalk robotic exoskeleton and its impact on quality of life. They are enrolling 160 Veterans with spinal cord injury at 10 VA sites.... (05/11/2017)

Gestational diabetes and preeclampsia rates higher in women with PTSD

Posttraumatic stress disorder may be a risk factor for two common pregnancy complications, according to a VA study. Women Veterans with PTSD receiving care in the VA health care system had higher rates of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia than those without PTSD.... (04/26/2017)

Studies probe pre-suicide contact with mental health care among Vets, soldiers

Two recent studies examined the phenomenon of Veterans and service members taking their lives shortly after contact with mental health providers. One points to high risk in the week following discharge from a psychiatric unit. The other study says many soldiers who die by suicide access health care shortly before death.... (04/26/2017)

Press 1 for relief: Phone system shows promise in easing low back pain

To help Veterans with chronic low back pain, VA researchers tested cognitive behavioral therapy delivered through an interactive voice response phone system to the patients in their homes. The approach worked just as well as in-person therapy.... (04/26/2017)

A measured approach to mental health care

One of the goals of VA’s QUERI for Team-Based Behavioral Health is to expand the use of measurement in VA mental health care. The focus is on using patient-reported measures consistently throughout treatment... (04/20/2017)

On the frontlines of diabetes prevention

Researchers compared two VA programs aimed at helping overweight or obese Veterans achieve a healthier weight and ideally stave off diabetes, which affects nearly 1 in 4 VA patients.... (04/20/2017)

Heavy versus light drinking: What are the relative effects on performance years later?

Heavy drinkers develop behavioral tolerance to alcohol over time on some fine motor tasks, but not on more complex tasks, suggests a study led by a VA San Diego Healthcare System researcher. ... (04/10/2017)

Launching VA lung cancer screening program is 'complex, challenging'

According to a recent VA study, developing and implementing a comprehensive lung-cancer screening program for the nearly 900,000 Veterans who are eligible is "complex and challenging, requiring new tools and patient care processes for staff, as well as dedicated patient coordination."... (04/05/2017)

VA surgeon researching cell-based tools to create artificial kidney

Dr. Jason Wertheim, a surgeon and biomedical engineer at the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center in Chicago, is leading a bioengineering effort to develop tissue for a replacement kidney and thus circumvent the problem of organ shortage.... (03/23/2017)

Testosterone therapy: Is the verdict now in?

A landmark seven-part study funded by the U.S. National Institute on Aging called the Testosterone Trials (TTrials) has produced mixed results.... (03/23/2017)

Study: Electroacupuncture eases pain through stem-cell release

A series of tests involving humans, horses, and rodents has provided the most thorough picture yet of how electroacupuncture—a modern version of the ancient Chinese healing art—eases pain and promotes tissue repair. The study included a VA researcher and more than 40 other clinicians and scientists.... (03/16/2017)

Probing the value of peer mentors for homeless Veterans

A recently published VA study explored the role of peer mentors—in this case, Veterans who were once homeless themselves—in improving the health outcomes of currently homeless Veterans.... (03/16/2017)

Study points to myelin changes as early marker of Alzheimer's

A VA study suggests that changes in myelin, a fatty white substance in the central nervous system that surrounds nerve fibers, may be a very early sign of Alzheimer's disease.... (03/16/2017)

Study shows how H. pylori causes white blood cells to morph

VA researchers and colleagues in Iowa showed in a lab study how neutrophils—the most common type of white blood cell—undergo changes when infected by the common pathogen H. pylori. The team is the first to demonstrate such changes in cells isolated from human blood.... (03/09/2017)

Blood pressure drug found to be better for bones, versus other treatments

A large database study by a team including a VA investigator shows that one of the drugs frequently given to combat high blood pressure, chlorthalidone, may also improve bone strength and cut the risk of osteoporotic fractures.... (02/28/2017)

What happens when patients access their mental health providers' notes?

Thanks to electronic health records and online portals, more and more patients have access to the notes their clinicians write about their health care visits. A study from one VA site offers insight into the potential for this feature, known as OpenNotes, to help—or hurt—patients' trust in their mental health clinicians.... (02/28/2017)

Chemical shows promise in subduing joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

VA and Stanford University researchers have tested a chemical compound that works to prevent an initial phase of tissue inflammation and improve the immune system. They say it holds promise for those with rheumatoid arthritis, in particular.... (02/16/2017)

VA-Defense study aims to track mild TBI over decades

VA and Defense researchers are enrolling at least 1,100 service members and Veterans who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan to learn more about mild traumatic brain injury and how it can be best evaluated, and perhaps prevented and treated.... (02/09/2017)

An alternative theory on how aspirin may thwart cancer

Many studies have pointed to a role for aspirin in cancer prevention. Scientists have been unsure how the drug works in this regard, although they usually cite aspirin’s anti-inflammatory effect. New lab studies by VA researchers and colleagues point to a different mechanism at play. ... (02/07/2017)

Program aims to help those with diabetes fend off foot ulcers

Researchers at the VA New York Harbor Healthcare System are seeking new ways to prevent the recurrence of foot ulcers in Veterans with diabetes. The problem is a leading cause of amputation... (02/07/2017)

Exploring the link between trauma and disordered eating for female Vets

A qualitative study involving a small group of female Veterans explored how military trauma that is related to such conditions as depression and PTSD can trigger disordered eating, a wide range of abnormal eating behaviors... (02/02/2017)

VA orthopedist hopes biologic disc will serve as cure for degenerative disease

VA researchers in Philadelphia are targeting degenerative disc disease with a lab-grown “biological disc” they say would act like a healthy, natural disc when transplanted into the body... (02/02/2017)

Light-based process could lead to new glaucoma treatments

In VA-funded work aimed at finding better treatments for glaucoma, researchers are using optogenetics, a new technique that relies on light to control the behavior of proteins or cells in living tissue. ... (01/19/2017)

Study finds wide, if uneven, use of PTSD psychotherapies in VA

A review of VA research studies has confirmed the widespread use in VA of two evidence-based psychotherapies to treat PTSD. But at the same time, the review points to inconsistencies in how the therapies are applied. ... (01/19/2017)

When non-adherence to guidelines is a good thing: Study on COPD yields surprising results

A study at the Northport VA Medical Center in Long Island, New York, offers a glimpse at what happens when doctors’ clinical intuition collides with the guidelines they are supposed to follow.... (01/19/2017)

Building a better denture

VA researchers are collaborating on a new antifungal denture that fights stomatitis, a recurring mouth infection that plagues denture wearers.... (01/11/2017)

Studies underscore drug risks for Vets using VA and Medicare

A set of recent VA studies pointed to safety risks for "dually enrolled" Veterans who have prescription drug coverage through both VA and Medicare Part D. ... (12/22/2016)

Study to explore needs of upper-limb amputees

Researchers hope the data they collect through a study of Veterans and active-duty members who have lost an upper limb will further improve amputation care in VA and the Department of Defense.... (12/22/2016)

Suicide exposure leaves emotional scars on Vets, service members

Research suggests that among military and Veteran populations, the loss of a loved one, friend, or peer to suicide may increase one’s own risk for suicide.... (12/22/2016)

Study links herbicide exposure, high blood pressure

A VA study has found that exposure to herbicides is "significantly associated" with the risk of high blood presure in members of the Army Chemical Corps.... (12/13/2016)

VA researcher seeks to improve HIV care for Vets in rural areas

A research project is using videoconferencing to connect Vets with HIV in rural areas with VA specialists in remote locations.... (12/13/2016)

Satellites, airport visibility readings shed light on troops’ exposure to dust storms, pollution

VA researchers and colleagues are looking to satellites and airport visibility readings to learn about hazardous air conditions facing deployed troops. ... (12/06/2016)

Learning from high-achievers with schizophrenia

VA researchers and colleagues in Los Angeles interviewed occupational high-achievers with schizophrenia to learn how they cope.... (12/06/2016)

Smartphone app helps Veterans control unpleasant thoughts

A VA-Defense study shows that the Virtual Hope Box smartphone app can help Veterans cope with stress and unpleasant thoughts, including those that could lead to suicide... (11/30/2016)

Program looks to improve family relationships for Vets coping with post-deployment challenges

Iraq and Afghanistan combat Veterans and their partners are taking part in a multifamily treatment program that is the centerpiece of an ongoing VA study... (11/23/2016)

Study: Physical environment checklist leads to sharp decline in inpatient suicides at VA facilities

VA's Mental Health Environment of Care Checklist has led to a sharp reduction in suicides among patients hospitalized in VA psychiatric units, says a new VA study.... (11/23/2016)

Study: Bacterial infections linked to increased risk of dementia in older Veterans

A VA study found that older Veterans are at much higher risk for dementia when they have a history of bacterial infections outside the central nervous system.... (11/17/2016)

Studies shed light on use of observation stays in VHA system

While the use of observation status may impact how patients are billed, this is not the driving force in determining the patient's status.... (11/17/2016)

Study: EEG can help tell apart PTSD, mild traumatic brain injury

A VA study suggests that EEGs, which measure brain waves, can be used to help tell apart PTSD from mild traumatic brain injury. Symptoms of the two conditions often overlap.... (11/10/2016)

Studies point to gene-based glitches in ill Gulf War Vets

Researchers at the Minneapolis VA have pinpointed genetic variants that appear to make Veterans more vulnerable to Gulf War illness. The team also found that a certain type of brain scan can reliably distinguish between Vets with and without the illness.... (11/10/2016)

Researchers exploring 3D printing to help Vets with disabilities

Created more than 30 years ago, three-dimensional printing (3DP) has seen a sudden rise in interest within medicine, and VA has been tapping the technology to improve life for disabled Veterans... (11/01/2016)

Study finds added burden on caregivers of Vets with PTSD and dementia

VA investigators recently published the first known study on the impact of co-existing PTSD and dementia on family caregivers, who provide the bulk of care to Veterans with those conditions.... (10/27/2016)

Document search tool may boost treatment of Vets with congestive heart failure

Clinicians and informatics experts at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System have designed a system that uses natural language processing to help improve care for Veterans with heart failure.... (10/27/2016)

VA’s Middleton Award to researchers studying bone diseases, cancer

VA has recognized two researchers with its 2016 Middleton Award: Dr. Stavros C. Manolagas, who studies osteoporosis and other metabolic bone diseases; and Dr. Ann Richmond, who studies cancer.... (10/20/2016)

Study finds epigenetic changes in children of Holocaust survivors

A team led by a VA researcher showed for the first time in humans that molecular changes caused by exposure to trauma can be passed on to children born after the event—in this case Holocaust survivors and their adult children... (10/20/2016)

VA lab research yields insight on heart condition common in Veterans

Lab research at the Columbia (Missouri) VA has important implications for Veterans and others with a common form of heart failure. The work offers new insight into how drugs called mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists can help... (10/06/2016)

Injectable antipsychotic leads to cost-savings for Vets with schizophrenia

A VA database study found cost-savings to treatment of schizophrenia with a long-acting injectable antipsychotic drug, versus oral atypical antipsychotics. The injectable drug was more expensive but saved on hospitalization costs... (09/29/2016)

Study confirms high cure rates with new hepatitis C drugs

A large database study found that new drug regimens for hepatitis C have resulted in "remarkably high" cure rates among patients in VA, the nation's largest provider of care for the condition.... (09/29/2016)

Closing in on biomarkers for suicidal behavior

An enzyme called ACMSD, involved in brain inflammation, could become an important target for new drugs aimed at preventing suicide... (09/22/2016)

Can ultrasound help rebuild knee cartilage?

A VA team is testing a potential new therapy that promises to regenerate cartilage. The researchers hope it can eventually be a viable alternative to drugs or surgery to treat arthritis... (09/22/2016)

Clerks—the unsung heroes of primary care?

A research team in Iowa has been studying VA Patient Aligned Care Teams, with a recent focus on clerks and the "emotional labor" they perform on behalf of patients... (09/13/2016)

Study: Iraq, Afghanistan Vets with brain injuries at increased risk of car crashes in post-deployment

A VA study found that Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans with traumatic brain injuries have a fourfold risk of being hospitalized from a motor vehicle crash, compared with Veterans of this cohort without such injuries ... (09/13/2016)

Research yields insight on sexual misconduct in the military going back to World War II

Amid a growing focus in recent years on sexual misconduct in the military, a new VA study offers a snapshot into the existence of sexual improprieties toward women in the military going back decades... (09/07/2016)

Study: No race bias in VA kidney transplant evaluations

In contrast to what has been found in some studies in the private sector, VA patients who need a kidney transplant are unlikely to face racial disparities in the evaluation process... (08/16/2016)

Lab team spins ginger into nanoparticles to heal inflammatory bowel disease

Researchers with VA and the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University have developed "edible ginger-derived nanoparticles" that they believe may be good medicine for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The particles may also help fight cancer linked to colitis, according to experiments in mice... (08/16/2016)

Fecal transplants—what do patients think?

For those struggling to rid themselves of C. difficile—which often involves severe diarrhea and overwhelming fatiguethe yuck factor involved with fecal transplants might be the least of their concerns, say researchers with VA and the University of Wisconsin... (07/27/2016)

Runners at no higher risk for knee arthritis, says study

VA and university researchers have analyzed data—including X-ray findings—on more than 2,000 people and concluded that runners are at no higher risk for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis... (07/27/2016)

Study in mice suggests stem cells could ward off glaucoma

An infusion of stem cells could help restore proper drainage for fluid-clogged eyes at risk for glaucoma. That's the upshot of a study led by a VA and University of Iowa team... (07/21/2016)

Cinnamon may be fragrant medicine for the brain

If Dr. Kalipada Pahan's research pans out, the standard advice for failing students might one day be: Study harder and eat your cinnamon... (07/21/2016)

New computer-based test aims to make PTSD screening faster, more accurate

VA researchers are developing a new tool to assess PTSD. Known as a computerized-adaptive test, the system uses a computer algorithm to adapt questions in real time based on the patient's answers to the previous items... (07/11/2016)

Yale-VA study yields promising results from genetically tailored pain treatment

A Yale-VA team used genetic information to tailor drug therapy for two patients with an inherited chronic pain syndrome. The researchers believe the approach may have wide potential for treating pain.... (07/11/2016)

Study yields potential blood biomarkers for Gulf War Illness

Based on a study of 85 Gulf War Veterans, VA researchers in Minneapolis have developed a tentative panel of blood markers they say can verify a diagnosis of Gulf War Illness with 90 percent accuracy... (07/05/2016)

Study traces impact of housing on health care for formerly homeless Veterans

Compared with Veterans who are still homeless, those in VA permanent supported housing receive outpatient care for more diagnoses, according to newly published research... (07/05/2016)

Atlanta VA studies highlighted at American Diabetes Association sessions

Two studies from the Atlanta VA Medical Center were spotlighted at the recent American Diabetes Association meeting. One looked at weight trends among Veterans. The other proposed a new approach to identifying those at risk for diabetes... (06/28/2016)

Hot on the trail of PTSD genes

There's no definitive evidence yet for any single gene or set of genes. But scientists have promising leads and believe they are drawing closer to genetically tailored PTSD therapy... (06/21/2016)

Study finds uptick in lung disease in recent Veterans

The prevalence of asthma, COPD, and some other lung conditions rose between 2003 and 2011 among VA patients who served in Iraq and Afghanistan... (05/23/2016)

Study suggests biomarkers could help ward off pressure ulcers for spinal cord injury patients

A team including a VA researcher pinpointed two proteins that appear to warn of the risk of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury... (05/13/2016)

Study: Symptoms of 'chronic multisymptom illness' may be common in Iraq, Afghanistan Veterans

In a study of more than 300 soldiers who had deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, a majority reported symptoms consistent with "chronic multisymptom illness"—a diagnosis that up till now has been associated mainly with Gulf War service... (05/13/2016)

How to engage Iraq, Afghanistan Veterans in health research: Lessons from focus groups

VA's Seattle Epidemiologic Research and Information Center conducted 10 focus groups in five U.S. cities in late 2015 to gain insight into how to involve Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans in VA research... (04/22/2016)

Study: Older age alone shouldn't rule out knee replacements

Total knee replacement has grown sharply in popularity in recent years, especially among middle-aged adults. Should older patients—say, those in their upper 80s—be disqualified from the surgery on the basis of age alone? No, say VA researchers.... (04/13/2016)

VA-Yale lab delivers cells in collagen scaffold that mimics bone marrow, where they originate

A VA-Yale team has devised a new way to deliver stem cells for healing diabetic ulcers. They say the method, shown to work in diabetic mice, has a good chance of working in human... (04/13/2016)

Study questions effectiveness of commonly used medication for back pain

A study at the VA San Diego Healthcare System suggests the pain medication gabapentin is no more effective than placebo at treating chronic low back pain. ... (04/06/2016)

New study reports on suicidal thinking among U.S. Veterans

Nearly 14 percent of Veterans reported suicidal thinking at one or both phases of a two-year VA study. The study involved more than 2,000 Veterans who took part in the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study... (04/04/2016)

Which bionic limb to prescribe? Gait lab aims to build evidence base

Today there are more than 100 different models of prosthetic feet available, ranging from the relatively simple to the sophisticated, and several models of computerized knees. How do clinicians know which components are best for a Veteran? VA researchers in New York aim to make the prescribing process more scientific... (03/23/2016)

Study: VA doing good job at managing migraines

A VA-Yale study that looked at the care of more than 57,000 Veterans diagnosed with migraine headaches finds that VA compares favorably with the private sector in terms of following best practices for treatment and prevention... (03/09/2016)

Beyond Alzheimer's: Study reveals how mix of brain ailments drives dementia

An analysis based on long-term studies of nuns and Japanese American men provides compelling new evidence that dementia often results from a mix of brain pathologies, rather than a single condition... (03/08/2016)

For mental health patients who smoke, more intensive phone support may boost quit rates

A study at six VA sites found that specialized counseling delivered by telephone may be more effective than standard state "quit-lines" to help smokers in mental health care kick the habit... (02/26/2016)

Study offers snapshot of colonoscopy quality in VA versus private sector

A study at one VA site found that the detection rate for potentially precancerous polyps—a key measure of colonoscopy quality—was higher among patients whose procedures were done in VA than among similar VA patients who were referred out for colonoscopy to private facilities... (02/26/2016)

Lab team aims to block blood supply of invasive breast cancer

In lab studies using mice, a team at the Washington, D.C., VA Medical Center has found that blocking a certain protein with a lab-made antibody can choke off the blood supply to aggressive breast tumors and thwart their growth... (02/17/2016)

High opioid doses could be marker for suicide risk

In a study of nearly 124,000 Veterans, those receiving the highest doses of opioids were more than twice as likely to die by suicide, compared with those receiving the lowest doses. But it's unclear whether there's a direct causal link. The high doses may be a marker for other factors that drive suicide—including unresolved severe chronic pain... (02/03/2016)

New robotic wheelchair in the works at Pittsburgh lab

A robotic wheelchair being developed by a VA and University of Pittsburgh team has a self-leveling feature that keeps the chair from spilling its driver onto the ground when traversing rough, sloping, or otherwise uneven surfaces... (02/03/2016)

Treating TBI and PTSD together

VA researchers in San Diego are testing a combination treatment that targets both PTSD and mild TBI. Weekly sessions weave in cognitive rehabilitation strategies with an evidence-based form of psychotherapy... (01/26/2016)

VA comparison of two 'water pills' will use new clinical-trial approach

A trial comparing two diuretic medications is one of the first examples in VA of "point of care" research. Experts say the innovative model is more cost-effective than conventional clinical trials, and the results easier to translate into everyday care... (01/26/2016)

PTSD pioneer Dr. Terence M. Keane receives 2015 Barnwell Award

Dr. Terence M. Keane, who helped lay the foundation for the understanding of PTSD as a serious mental health problem that can stem from both military and civilian traumas, received the 2015 Barnwell Award from VA Clinical Science Research and Development... (01/19/2016)

Dr. James Henry receives VA's Magnuson Award for advancing tinnitus treatment

Dr. James Henry, an audiology researcher widely known for his innovative work on treating and managing tinnitus, is the recipient of VA's 2016 Paul B. Magnuson Award... (01/12/2016)

Cardiologist cited for work on heart arrhythmias

Dr. Nabil El-Sherif received the American College of Cardiology's prestigious Distinguished Science Award for 2016 in recognition of his pacesetting research on heart arrhythmias... (01/12/2016)


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