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In Brief

Rat study: Brain injury can cause PTSD without psychological stressors

Rat study: Brain injury can cause PTSD without psychological stressors


‘Next-step’ depression treatment medications are cost-effective


Many patients taking PPIs concerned about adverse effects


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 Columbus Freeman of Arkansas, who served 17 years in the National Guard, underwent two amputations on his left leg—first below the knee, and then above—as the result of vascular blockages. A new VA-DoD study is looking at the long-term outcomes of Veterans who suffered severe vascular injuries but did not have their limb amputated.

Volunteering in VA Research

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) ranks as one of the nation's leaders in health research. Thousands of studies are conducted at VA medical centers, outpatient clinics, and nursing homes each year. This research has significantly contributed to advancements in health care for Veterans and other Americans from every walk of life... Learn more



Participate in research: Million Veteran Program (MVP), VA Office of R&D Clinical Trials, Cognition, Behavior and Caregiver Burden in ALS, Novel Interventions for Gulf War Illness, Collaborative Aging (in Place) Research using Technology (CART)


Research Topic of the Day

Substance Use Disorders

Substance Use Disorders

Substance use and abuse is a major public health problem. It commonly occurs along with other mental and physical problems, such as depression or chronic pain... Learn more

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Research News from Local VA Medical Centers and our Academic, Federal, and Industry Research Partners

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Media Reports

More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds
(CNN, Feb. 11, 2019)

More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds


“More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment to instead watch and wait to see whether their cancer progresses—and experts say that's a good thing,” according to a CNN article. Among other research, the piece cited a VA study published last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association that found that the use of a conservative approach for managing prostate cancer rose sharply in VA between 2005 and 2015. Dr. Stacy Loeb, a urologist and researcher with VA and New York University, told CNN, “It's very encouraging that the proportion of men who are receiving conservative management for low-risk prostate cancer has increased so much over time. ... However, it appears there's still a long way to go."

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