Office of Research & Development

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Current VA Research Using Canines

This page shows each protocol for VA research with dogs that has been approved by the Secretary of VA for work to proceed. The table includes links for each project to:

  • The final animal protocol form approved by the local IACUC and the office of the CVMO
  • The feedback document (“Secondary Review”) provided by the CVMO’s office to the station.  This feedback is provided by at least one boarded laboratory animal veterinarian and reviewed by the CVMO, also a boarded laboratory animal veterinarian. This guides the local IACUC and the investigator as they revise earlier versions of the animal protocol form, to ensure that the final version meets the standards required for CVMO approval.
  • A summary of the literature search done by the CVMO’s office as part of the review. A PhD scientist with special training in database and literature searches does an independent literature review, and summarizes key points in this document.

Protocol

Funding Source

VA Location

1. High Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation to Restore Cough

Protocol Form

Feedback Document

Summary of the Literature

VA

Cleveland, OH

Purpose of Research:  Veterans with spinal cord injuries that impair their ability to cough are vulnerable to potentially fatal respiratory infections. This study evaluates how electrical stimulation of the spinal cord could be optimized to activate respiratory muscles appropriately to generate effective coughing.

2. Neuropharmacology of Pontine Control of Breathing Frequency

Protocol Form

Feedback Document

Summary of the Literature

VA

Milwaukee, WI

Purpose of Research:  Veterans with certain head or neck injuries, or who suffer from pain that can only be controlled with potent analgesics, often experience impaired control of breathing and coughing. This work is to increase understanding of that control, which is fundamental to developing better ways to help these veterans.

Comments:  The PI has retired and is writing papers to publish remaining data; protocol is active but no further work is expected unless reviewers require it

3. Mechanistic Insight of Premature Ventricular Contractions- induced Cardiomyopathy

Protocol Form

Feedback Document

Summary of the Literature

NIH

Richmond, VA

Purpose of Research:  Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs) interfere with proper beating of the heart. This is research into the cellular mechanisms involved, which we need to understand in order to develop better ways to manage PVCs.

4. Autonomic Nerve Activity and Cardiac Arrhythmias

Protocol Form

Feedback Document

Summary of the Literature

American Heart

Richmond, VA

Purpose of Research:  Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) interfere with nerve signals to the heart, and can damage heart muscle. This is research into how the loss of nerve signals might be responsible for the damage, which we need to understand in order to develop better ways to protect the heart.

5. Nanoparticle Injection into Ganglionated Neural Plexi to Prevent Atrial Fibrillation

Protocol Form

Feedback Document

Summary of the Literature

Other

 --

Virginia Commonwealth

Richmond, VA

Purpose of Research:  Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke, heart failure, hospitalization, and death, but current treatments for AF are risky. This is research into new ways to treat AF with less risk than is currently possible.

6. A Comparison of Canine Anesthetic Regimens to Optimize Hemodynamic Stability and Quality of Electrophysiologic and Neurophysiologic Data Acquisition

Protocol Form

Feedback Document

Summary of the Literature

Other

 --

internal funds

Richmond, VA

Purpose of Research:  Sedatives and anesthetics commonly affect how the heart works. This study is designed to sort out how to improve anesthesia for future studies of cardiac function.


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